The years 1951 to 1955 saw the continued growth of Company products, particularly adhesives. This resulted in the formation of the Industrial Adhesives Division in 1951.

The building of a new Adhesive factory at Common Road was completed in 1954, followed by polishes and bitumen in 1955.

The Company started to manufacture a range of mastics, which were introduced into the DIY market.

The sales of building chemicals and roof waterproofing materials continued to expand, as did the roof waterproofing contracts.



1951


Although the Company only manufactured a range of specialised protective paints Dr Simon was determined that the company became a leading manufacturer of such paints.

In October 1951 Dr. Simon signed an agreement with a Dr. Egon Meyer for Evode to manufacture under license a number of specialised paints and chemicals.

A number of these had been patented in Germany and in particular a metal primer which we were to call "Evoled"! was soon to give us a major advantage over our competitors by providing a corrosion inhibiting process for chlorinated rubber paints.



A second hand Hurrell Bitumen Emulsifier was purchased to meet the increasing demand for Evodes Roof Waterproofing Systems.

Up to that time, the bitumens were manufactured to Evode's specification by Bristol Bitumen Emulsions.


1952


On the 17th January 1952 a fire destroyed a two storey building at the entrance to the Glover Street factory, but fortunately valuable formulae and production documents were saved. The ground floor contained a large number of rolls of bitumen impregnated hessian, whilst the upper floor, which was the laboratory, had stocks of flammable adhesives, paints and solvents. Fortunately most of the laboratory's technical records survived the fire but a considerable number of valuable pieces of equipment were destroyed. Nevertheless, within 24 hours the laboratory had been moved to temporary accommodation in a building on the site known as the "Tile House". It is believed that a steam boiler was once housed in this ornately tiled building and it was probably used to drive machines in the original shoe factory.



The 19th A.G.M. was held on the 18th February 1952 and the Chairman placed on record the sterling qualities of Mr. J.J.E Forman at the fire in using his efforts to ensure that the fire did not spread to the more vulnerable adhesives factory.

At an extraordinary General Meeting held on the same day the capital of the company was increased to £50,000 by the creation of 42,900 shares at £1 each.

Mr. K Shardlow joined the Company on 25th October 1952, taking over responsibilities for transport from Laurie Powell. The staff consisted of 4 in the office which covered not only the dispatch of goods, but incoming supplies and buying. The fleet consisted of 2x5 tons Bedfords, occasionally helped out by the then Carter Paterson Parcels, and British Rail, the volume involved was up to 50 tons per week including English Waxes. British Rail collected by horse and cart.

On the 17th December 1952 the Board of Trade issued an Industrial Development Certificate, allowing Evode Ltd. to develop land in the Borough of Stafford for 64,750 sq.ft. of factory, offices and laboratories. Following the successful tests of ‘Evo-Stik’ for the bonding of ‘Formica’ laminate sheeting to worktops the adhesive was approved by Thomas de la Rue. This association resulted in Evo-Stik becoming a household name and the eventual recognition of Evode as leading manufacturer of adhesives.




1953


In order to advance that ability of the Company to develop new products, in January 1953 Dr. Barry S. Jackson joined the Company as a works laboratory chemist. (His history appears in appendix 68 of the linear history) His priority was the development of bituminous emulsion for roof waterproofing At first he was absent for a fortnight having to learn everything that had been done concerning emulsions, the new product. There was a coal fired boiler, then a small Hurrell arrived, and the manufacture of emulsions was started. This was both successful and unsuccessful, and a lot of experiments were carried out, but eventually Dr. Jackson hit the spot!! So manufacturing went ahead, the difficult part was how to preserve the product for a longer period of time, like Paste-Con, which had been our first big breakthrough.

About 80 barrels were initially produced, which was a beautiful material, but when it was opened two months later there were only 5 gallons left, the rest had grown into fungi inside the barrels. It was not known exactly which resin to use for the emulsification to stop the corrosion of the inside of the barrel so all of it was scrapped, and Dr. Jackson suggested that potassium-bicromate should be introduced to prevent the corrosion, and he was absolutely right!! Four batches of 400 to 500 gallon batches of paste were then manufactured to the existing formulation with the addition of bicromate, and it worked! So, a huge stockpile of Pastecon was made.

The department consisted of Ted and Dan Wojtulewicz, and 2 other Polish workers. - "Well we had no foreigners" as Mr. Peak used to quip, "as there were no English people in the Department!!" Bitumen was taken in solid form and the drums had to be chopped open by hand, then the bitumen was split up by hand which was quite a job!. It was then thrown into a coal baited road tanker, a fire was lit underneath to melt the bitumen. It was a 5 ton road tanker and it was loaded with 3 tons of bitumen, and 2 tons of water as well so that 5 tons of 60% bitumen emulsion was produced. The hot bitumen was then gravity fed from the road tanker down to the Hurrell, so was the water, and then pumped up by the force of the Hurrell into an outside storage tank.

There was a seasonable demand for waterproofing, particularly with bitumen emulsions, and there was a tendency to move people in and out of the factory. There was a picture of Reg Mosely working on a contract for the Stole Theatre in London in the brochure the salesmen had, and he would be out working in the summer time and come back into the factory in wintertime. So there was quite a lot of exchange of that sort.


A site was purchased in March 1953 for £6,500 consisting of 9 acres 37 perches at Common Road and building of the new factory quickly commenced. A conveyancing agreement between Evode Ltd. and a Mr T.B. Follows was signed on the 25th March 1953 for the purchase of 9 acres 37 perches of land for the sum of £6,500. The plot of land at Common Road Stafford had been a former brick works having two disused kilns, a brick chimney and various derelict buildings.

During the Directors meeting on 4th June 1953 Mr Forman requested that he be allowed to address the meeting "He wished to bring to the shareholders notice that Evode Limited was 21 years old yesterday, 3rd June. It was incorporated on the 3rd June 1932 in the name of Spic and Span Shoe Polishes Limited. Its early years were those of losses, but our present Chairman and Managing Director joined the Company in 1938 and under his careful guidance, and the hard work he has put into the business great consolidation has resulted each year."

Early manufacturing problems with household ‘Impact’ adhesive were resolved and Mr.E.H.Beaumont was now confident enough to create practical associations with manufacturers of laminated plastic sheeting. Thomas De La Rue, the manufacturers of "Formica” had been seeking a foolproof adhesive for bonding their laminated sheet to wood without this it was not possible for them to launch their laminate onto the retail market. They agreed to test Evo-Stik household adhesive. After numerous practical trials, requiring many formulation changes lasting over some months, Thomas De La Rue expressed satisfaction with the product. Evo-Stik Household (Impact) Adhesive, as shown on the 7/- tin label now entered the domestic consumer market as the adhesive recommended for "Formica". By the end of 1953 appropriate packaging and sales promotional material had been organised and by agreement with Thomas De La Rue Evo-Stik would be distributed to the retail and hardware stores using twelve major Timber Merchants.

In 1953 another paints chemist joined the company - Mr. Adolf Adomenas and he had the responsibility of producing pigment dispersions and to do this a brand new Vickars high speed triple roll mill had been purchased. It is believed that this machine was the most costly piece of equipment that had been purchased.

During the latter half of 1953 building and site development at Common Road had been progressing. In the early months of 1954 progress on the erection of the new factory had now reached the stage where the transferring of adhesives production and equipment from Glover Street could take place. The first factory building on site was Building 7. The house which was built cost £2,994.4s.8., and the factory £44,136. 10s.11d. Building work continued on the polish and bitumen products factory which were occupied in 1955. The move from Glover Street to Common Road upon completion of the first building was reported in the press and many journals. Appendix 72 of the linear history is probably a press release in 1955 as it describes the manufacture of bitumen products (polish and bitumen moved in 1955).


1954


In 1953 and 1954 the momentum of growth continued. Many appointments were made throughout the company of sales representatives for adhesives and building chemical products.

In November 1954 the Despatch Department was split in two and Mr. Shardlow set up the first office on the new site at Common Road working in conjunction with the other half of production at Glover Street to keep things running smoothly. The office was on the end on a long building most of which was used for making adhesive On one side was the mill room and next to that tins being filled from a barrel with a tap, and tubes were filled by hand, - the girls squeezed the end of the tube together then used a little machine to seal them. The inners in the small tins were knocked in firmly with a piece of wood and lids screwed up tightly before being packed into cartons which someone else was making up with Sellotape at the end of the table.

Product advertising was also now being increased in the National Press and do-it-yourself journals. In December 1954 a meeting was held at Vik Supplies to discuss a selling agreement which would be mutually beneficial to both, Evode Ltd. and Vik Supplies Ltd.


1955


In January H Bothfield, President of Angiers Products Inc, 120 Potter Street Cambridge Massachusetts visited Dr Simon at Stafford site.

Following on from the contacts made by Dr. Simon and Mr. Beaumont in Europe over the previous 4 years licences to manufacture Evode products were signed.

On the 6th January 1955 at a meeting of the Directors of English Waxes Ltd.., held at Messrs. Lotus Ltd., Mrs. D Wood offered her resignation as a Director of English Waxes Ltd., her resignation was accepted with regret, and a payment of £70 was made to her for loss of office.

Dr Simon was always willing to devote time to walk round the factory as often as he could to talk to the workers and at the employees annual dinner and dance held on 7th January 1955 at the Swan Hotel, Stafford he paid tribute to the way the workforce had served the Company.

At an extraordinary General Meeting of the company held on the lst March it was unanimously agreed to increase the capital of the company to £100,000 by the creation of 50,000 shares of £1 each. The completion of two more buildings to house the manufacture of polishes and bitumen based products now allowed both sections to move up from Glover Street to Common Road. With the completion of the buildings to house the Bituminous Emulsion Plant, trials commenced on the new plant. The first of a range of bitumen emulsion products was manufactured in September. and a press release from the journal "Architectural" Design" indicates the growing use of these products abroad.

A new company, Evode Industries Ltd., was established in Swords Co Dublin In June 1955, a government decision to restrict importation of adhesives into Ireland, except on payment of duty created a new situation and a decision was then taken by Dr. Simon to set up this manufacturing unit in Ireland. The Evode Industries factory initially produced adhesives, latices and some waterproofing materials.

During 1955 the company made a number of technical staff appointments and July saw the arrival of Mr. E.A. Duligal, who was appointed to introduce a range of decorative paints and specialty coatings in order to raise the turnover and profitability of the Paints Division.

On the 1st August 1955 Mr Vasek Vohralik joined the Company as an Adhesives Chemist and became Chief Chemist of the Adhesives Division in 1959. In the following years he became a Director and held a number of Board appointments. In late 1955 Mr J H Bryant joined the company as Technical Manager of the newly formed Evode Mastics Division. He was engaged with the development of mastic, sealing compounds and caulking compounds at his previous company. He will produce a range of coloured mastic to builders merchants and later to DIY outlets.

The activities of Evode Roof Waterproofing contracts Dept. were steadily progressing, and Dr. Simon always inspected any all large roofing contracts with Mr. Colin Williamson who had been appointed manager in 1948. The large variety of roofing structures required careful choice of waterproofing specification, and Dr. Simon’s early experience in Germany with bituminous emulsions, resulted in the Evode "built-up" system acquiring a first class reputation. An article was published in "Building Materials” describing the values of Evode Roof Water Proofing System (appendix 64 of the linear history).

The increasing sales of the new adhesives into the shoe industry now led Dr. Simon to appoint Mr. E.H. Beaumont in September to launch these products into other industries. He had a considerable technical knowledge of adhesives and a wide experience of industrial marketing. He concentrated his activities in promoting Evode Adhesives into a wide range of markets which embraced the motorcar, shipping, building, clothing, leather and many other industries. Mr. Beaumont, who was based in the London office on Edgeware Road, also travelled to Europe to investigate adhesive requirements.

Extract from Machinery Lloyd, March 1954:

EVODE INDUSTRIAL MATERIALS

As part of their current programme of expansion, Evode Ltd., makers of high quality waterproofing and protective compounds, adhesives and paints, have established new offices at 1 Victoria Street, London SW1. Considerable development is also in hand at the Evode factory and laboratories at Stafford. Production capacity is being extended with he erection of a completely new set of buildings planned to incorporate the latest equipment for the production of industrial chemicals. To accommodate this and long term expansion an extensive site was bought by Evode on the outskirts of Stafford.

The new London offices, initially designed to ease the head office of increasing administrative pressure, are to be further extended at a later date to accommodate the growing export business. This decision has been taken because of the substantial demand for Evode materials from foreign markets.


Extract from The Builder, 8th October 1954

BAGHDAD FAIR EXHIBITS

Evode Ltd., of Stafford manufacturers of concrete admixtures, protective paints, bituminous products and roof waterproofing systems are exhibiting at the British Trade Fair which opens in Baghdad on October 25. As a result of a recent visit to Iraq on his way to East Africa by Mr. Eric Barnes, the company's export representative, arrangements have been made for Evode to share a stand at the exhibition with the Middle East Development Co., Ltd., who have been appointed sole distributors of Evode's chemical building protection materials for Iraq. A varied display will be given of a wide range of products.


Extract from ‘THE MASTER BUILDER’, June 1955

Mr. Eric Barnes, export manager of Evode Limited, the roof waterproofing and bituminous product specialists and manufacturers of concrete admixes and productive industrial left recently for another of the Mediterranean. His object is to visit a hospital under construction and a number of other important institutional buildings in Cyprus, where Evode materials have been specified for roof waterproofing, painting and concrete; to study current conditions and have consultations in Gibraltar and Malta, and to appoint further Evode Agents in Gibraltar, Malta, Syria, Egypt and Libya. Mr. E H Beaumont, sales and technical manager of the company’s Industrial Adhesive Division, has also left for four-week tour of the U.S.A. He is to study the most recent development in adhesives in their application in American industry and he will also have as associates, Angier Products Inc. of Boston Massachusetts.

Product advertising was also now being increased in the National Press and do-it-yourself journals. In December 1954 a meeting was held at Vik Supplies to discuss a selling agreement which would be mutually beneficial to both, Evode Ltd. and Vik Supplies Ltd.

In November 1954 the Despatch Department was split in two and Mr. Shardlow set up the first office on the new site at Common Road working in conjunction with the other half of production at Glover Street to keep things running smoothly.

The office was on the end on a long building most of which was used for making adhesive. On one side was the mill room and next to that tins being filled from a barrel with a tap, and tubes were filled by hand, - the girls squeezed the end of the tube together then used a little machine to seal them. The inners in the small tins were knocked in firmly with a piece of wood and lids screwed up tightly before being packed into cartons which someone else was making up with Sellotape at the end of the table.